Health and wellness benefits of meditation

1001 GOOD REASONS TO LEARN TM!

This is a list of some of the documented, peer reviewed and published benefits of daily transcendence through the Transcendental Meditation Program®

Also, the most recent TM research (research after to 2009) is not included in this document. It will be included in the next edition of this list. Not all research is listed here, I stopped adding when I got to 1001.

References that begin with “Vol.” refer to material included in the Scientific Research On The Transcendental Meditation And TM-Sidhi Program: Collected Papers, Volumes 1 To 5.

1. Increased Longevity (Vol.[4] 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
2. Increased Cognitive Flexibility (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
3. Increased Learning Ability (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
4. Greater Perceptual Flexibility (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
5. Increased Word Fluency (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
6. Improvements in Behavioral Flexibility (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
7. Improvements in Self-Reported Aging (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
8. Greater Sense of Well-being (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
9. Improved Mental Health(Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
10. Reduction of Blood Pressure(Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
11. Younger Biological Age Compared to Norms (Vol. 3: 242.)
12. Younger Biological Age Compared to Controls (Vol. 3: 242.)
13. Longitudinal Reduction in Biological Age (Vol. 3: 246.)
14. 70% Reduction in Hospitalization in Individuals over 40 Years Old who Transcend, Compared to Norms (Vol. 5: 378.)
15. Hormone Levels Indicating Younger Age (Vol. 5: 376.)
16. Lower Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Levels Indicating Less Serious Illness and Slower Aging (Vol. 5: 377.)
17. Reduction of Aging Effects as Assessed by Perceptual/Motor Speed and Non-Verbal Intelligence (Vol.5: 393.)
18. Duration of TM Linked to Younger Biological Age (Vol. 3: 242, 245, 246)
19. Younger Physiological Age as Reflected in Levels of Systolic Blood Pressure (Vol. 3: 245.)
20. Younger Physiological Age as Reflected in Levels of Auditory Threshold (Vol. 3: 245.)
21. Superior Performance on Tests Measuring the Age Related Psychological Variable of Visual Memory (Vol. 3: 257, Vol. 5: 393.)
22. Superior Performance on Tests Measuring the Age Related Psychological Variable of Creativity (Vol. 3: 257, Vol. 5: 393.)
23. Superior Performance on Tests Measuring the Age Related Psychological Variable of Field Independence (Vol. 3: 257, Vol. 5: 393.)
24. Superior Performance on Tests Measuring the Age Related Psychological Variable of Perceptual Speed (Vol. 3: 257, Vol. 5: 393.)
25. Superior Performance on Tests Measuring the Age Related Psychological Variable of Motor Speed (Vol. 3: 257, Vol. 5: 393.)
26. Superior Performance on Tests Measuring the Age Related Psychological Variable of Reaction Time (Vol. 3: 257, Vol. 5: 393.)
27. Superior Performance on Tests Measuring the Age Related Psychological Variable of and Non-Verbal Intelligence (Vol. 3: 257, Vol. 5: 393.)
28. Faster Processing of Cognitively Complex Information in the Elderly as Measured by Event-Related Potentials (Vol. 5: 374.)
29. Other Findings Indicating Reversal of the Aging Process (Vol. 1: 15, 18, 25–28, 31–42, 45–53, 55–58, 63, 65, 67, 74, 77, 78, 87, 88, 103, 104; Vol. 2: 123–126, 128–130, 134, 136, 143, 147, 150, 158; Vol. 3: 195, 197, 202, 232, 233, 235, 236, 239. 240. 244. 248. 250. 251. 254–256. 259–261 268, 273, 277, 278, 280, 290; Vol. 4: 294, 299–301, 307.)
30. Improved Cardiovascular Health Associated w/ Longevity (Vol. 1-5)
31. Improved Work Satisfaction Associated w/ Longevity(Vol. 1-5)
32. Improved Positive Health Habits Associated w/ Longevity (Vol. 1-5)
33. Improved Physical Function Associated w/ Longevity(Vol. 1-5)
34. Improved Happiness Rating Associated w/ Longevity(Vol. 1-5)
35. Improved Self-Health Rating Associated w/ Longevity(Vol. 1-5)
36. Improved Intelligence Associated w/ Longevity(Vol. 1-5)
37. Improved Mental Health Associated w/ Longevity (Vol. 1-5)
38. Decreased Metabolic Rate(Vol. 1: 1–4, 6, 7, 9; Vol. 2: 108, 130; Vol. 3: 205; Vol. 5: 357, 359)
39. Decreased O2 Consumption(Vol. 1: 1–4, 6, 7, 9; Vol. 2: 108, 130; Vol. 3: 205; Vol. 5: 357)
40. Decreased Carbon Dioxide Elimination (Vol. 1: 1–4, 6, 7, 9; Vol. 3: 205.)
41. Decreased Tidal Volume (Lung Capacity) (Vol. 1: 9; Vol. 4: 293.)
42. Decreased Minute Ventilation (Vol. 1: 1-4, 7; Vol. 2: 108; Vol. 3: 205; Vol. 4: 293.)
43. Decreased Respiration Rate (Vol. 1: 2–5, 9, 10; Vol. 2: 108; Vol. 3: 197, 205)
44. Lower Respiration Rate than Ordinary Rest (Vol. 5: 356, 358.)
45. Periodic Breath Suspension (Vol. 1: 7, 8; Vol. 3: 197, 205, 213; Vol. 4: 293; Vol. 5)
46. Increased Ease of Breathing (Vol. 1: 6.)
47. Increased Airway Conductance (Vol. 1: 6.)
48. Decreased Heart Rate (Vol. 1: 1–4, 6; Vol. 2: 108; Vol. 3: 197, 205; Vol. 4: 302; Vol. 5)
49. Increased Blood Flow to the Brain (Vol. 2: 105, 106; Vol. 3: 194, 195.)
50. EEG Indications of a Unique State of Restful Alertness (Vol. 1: 1–4, 7, 14, 15, 17, 18; Vol. 2: 117; Vol. 3: 211, 213, 220; Vol. 5: 369.)
51. Increased Basal Skin Resistance (Vol. 1: 1–4, 22–25; Vol. 2: 130; Vol. 3: 205; Vol. 4: 293; Vol. 5: 356.)
52. Higher Basal Skin Resistance than Simple Rest (Vol. 5: 3: 56)
53. Decreased Spontaneous Skin Resistance Responses (Vol. 1: 25–27; Vol. 2: 130; Vol. 3: 197, 205.)
54. Increased Muscle Relaxation (Vol. 1: 15; Vol. 2: 122; Vol. 3: 209, 212.)
55. Reduced Difference between Arterial and Venous CO2 Content in Forearm Metabolism (Vol. 5: 361.)
56. Reduced Metabolism in Muscle Tissue (Vol. 3: 207; Vol. 4: 291)
57. Reduced Glucose Metabolism in Red Blood Cells (Vol. 2: 112; Vol. 3: 203; Vol. 4: 292; Vol. 5: 362.)
58. Reduction in Biochemical Indices of Stress (Vol. 1: 2–4; Vol. 3: 194, 203; Vol. 4: 291, 292.)
59. Decrease of the Stress Indicator of Arterial Lactate Levels (Vol. 1: 2–4; Vol. 3: 194, 203; Vol. 4: 291, 292.)
60. Decrease of the Stress Indicator of Plasma Cortisol Levels (Vol. 1: 12; Vol. 2: 109, 111; Vol. 3: 190, 191, 200, 202.)
61. Lower Plasma Lactate than Ordinary Rest (Vol. 5: 356)
62. Unique Changes in Biochemical and Hormonal Balance (Vol. 1: 13; Vol. 2: 107, 110, 113; Vol. 3: 192, 196, 198–200, 202, 204, 206, 208; Vol. 5: 363–368, 376.)
63. Transcending Associated with High EEG Coherence (Vol. 1: 7; Vol. 3: 197, 205, 213; Vol. 4: 293; Vol. 5: 358.)
64. Transcending Associated with Marked Reductions in Respiration Rate (Vol. 1: 7; Vol. 3: 197, 205, 213; Vol. 4: 293; Vol. 5: 358.)
65. Transcending Associated with Marked Reductions in Heart Rate (Vol. 1: 7; Vol. 3: 197, 205, 213; Vol. 4: 293; Vol. 5: 358)
66. Transcending Associated with marked reductions in Metabolic Rate (Vol. 1: 7; Vol. 3: 197, 205, 213; Vol. 4: 293; Vol. 5: 358)
67. Transcending Associated with Periodic Breath Suspension (Vol. 1: 7; Vol. 3: 197, 205, 213; Vol. 4: 293; Vol. 5: 358)
68. Transcending Associated with marked reductions in Absence of Spontaneous Skin Resistance Responses (Vol. 1: 7; Vol. 3: 197, 205, 213; Vol. 4: 293; Vol. 5: 358)
69. Transcending Associated with marked reductions in High Basal Skin Resistance (Vol. 1: 7; Vol. 3: 197, 205, 213; Vol. 4: 293; Vol. 5)
70. Decreased Urinary Free Cortisol Levels Biochemically Indicating Reduced Stress (Vol. 2: 109.)
71. Increased Autonomic Stability(Vol. 1: 25–28, 87; Vol. 2: 123, 130; Vol. 3: 197)
72. Less Stressful Interaction with the Environment (Vol. 1: 25–28; Vol. 2: 123; Vol. 5: 370.)
73. Improved Resistance to Stress (Vol. 1: 25–28; Vol. 2: 123; Vol. 5: 370.)
74. Improved Stress Reactivity (Vol. 5: 367.)
75. Lower Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Sensitivity (Vol. 5: 367.)
76. Lower Blood Reactivity to Stress (Vol. 5: 367.)
77. Lower Resting Blood Pressure (Vol. 5: 367.)
78. Lower Resting Epinephrine Level (Vol. 5: 367.)
79. Lower Chronic Stress (Vol. 5: 368.)
80. Normal Neuroendocrine Reactivity (Vol. 5: 368.)
81. Meditating Type A Subjects Showed Healthy Neuroendocrine Pattern (Vol. 5: 368.)
82. Maintenance of a Relaxed Style of Physiological Functioning Outside of Meditation (Vol. 1: 6, 18, 30; Vol. 3: 197; Vol. 5: 356)
83. Lower Baseline Levels of Spontaneous Skin Resistance Responses Outside of TM (Vol. 5: 356.)
84. Lower Baseline Levels of Respiration Rate Outside the Practice of TM (Vol. 5: 356.)
85. Lower Baseline Heart Rate Outside of TM (Vol. 5: 356.)
86. Lower Baseline Plasma Lactate Outside of TM (Vol. 5: 356.)
87. Maintenance of Relaxation during a Task (Vol. 2: 122.)
88. More Settled Physiological Response during Cognitively Demanding Tasks (Vol. 5: 372.)
89. Increased Physiological Stability during Task Performance (Vol. 5: 399.)
90. Unique Pattern of DNA Repair (Vol. 5: 360.)
91. Decreased Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Subjects (Vol. 1: 32–34; Vol. 2: 124, 125; Vol. 3: 233, 235, 238; Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
92. Reduction of Blood Pressure to More Ideal Levels in Normatensive Subjects (Vol. 2: 124; Vol. 3: 233, 244–246; Vol. 5: 367, 380.)
93. Lower Hospital Admissions for Heart Disease (Vol. 5: 378)
94. Decreased need for Anti-Hypertensives (Vol. 3: 238, 247.)
95. Decreased Serum Cholesterol Levels in Normal and Hypercholesterolaemic Patients (Vol. 3: 202, 233, 236.)
96. Improvements in Angina Pectoris (Vol. 1: 35; Vol. 3: 238)
97. Improved Exercise Tolerance (Vol. 1: 35; Vol. 3: 238.)
98. Increased Maximum Workload (Vol. 1: 35.)
99. Delayed Appearance of Electrocardiographic Abnormalities during Exercise (Vol. 1: 35.)
100. Delayed Onset of ST Segment Depression (Vol. 1: 35.)
101. Decreased Double Product (Vol. 1: 35.)
102. Decreased Need for Heart Disease Drugs (Vol. 1: 35; Vol. 3: 238)
103. Lower Baseline Levels of Heart Rate (Vol. 5: 356, 358.)
104. Improved Cardiovascular Efficiency (Vol. 1: 35; Vol. 2: 130.)
105. Improved Blood Sugar Control in Diabetics (Vol. 3 238)
106. Improvements in Bronchial Asthma (Vol. 1: 2, 36–38; Vol. 3: 232, 238.)
107. Reduced Severity of Symptoms (Vol. 1: 2, 36–38; Vol. 3: 232, 238.)
108. Reduced Airway Resistance (Vol. 1: 36–38.)
109. Decreased Need for Anti-Asthmatic Drugs (Vol. 3: 238, 247.)
110. Improvements in Chronic Bronchitis (Vol. 3: 238.)
111. Fewer Upper Respiratory Tract Infections (Vol. 1: 2; Vol. 3: 238.)
112. Improved Respiratory Efficiency (Vol. 1: 6; Vol. 2: 130.)
113. Less Nose, Throat, & Lung Hospital Admissions (Vol. 5: 378.)
114. Increased Orderliness of Brain Functioning (Vol. 4, 14–18, 20, 102; Vol. 2: 115, 117; Vol. 3: 205, 210, 211, 213, 215, 217, 218, 224; Vol. 4: 294–296.)
115. Increased Integration of Brain Functioning(Vol. 1: 14–17, 20, 102; Vol. 3: 205, 210, 211, 213, 215, 217, 218, 224; Vol. 4: 294–296; Vol. 5: 370, 371, 375.)
116. Increased Brain Wave Coherence(Vol. 1: 20, 21, 102; Vol. 3: 205, 210, 213, 215, 217, 218, 224; Vol. 4: 294, 296; Vol. 5: 370, 371.)
117. Increased EEG Coherence at the Moment of Performance of TM-Sidhi Yogic Flying (Vol. 1: 102; Vol. 5: 375.)
118. Increased EEG Coherence during Acquisition of New Information (Vol. 5: 372.)
119. Increased Blood Flow to the Brain (The Basis of Optimizing Brain Functioning) (Vol. 2: 105, 106; Vol. 3: 194, 195.)
120. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between Duration of Practice and High EEG Coherence (Vol. 4: 296.)
121. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between High EEG Coherence and Experience of Transcendental Consciousness (Vol. 1: 21.)
122. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between High Levels of Creativity and Experience of Transcendental Consciousness (Vol. 1: 21.)
123. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between Neurological Efficiency and Experience of Transcendental Consciousness (Vol. 1: 21.)
124. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between High EEG Coherence and High Levels of Creativity (Vol. 1: 102; Vol. 3: 216.)
125. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between Higher States of Consciousness and High Levels of Creativity (Vol. 1: 102; Vol. 3: 216.)
126. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between Experience of the TM-Sidhis, and High Levels of Creativity (Vol. 1: 102; Vol. 3: 216.)
127. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between Increased Frontal EEG Coherence and Increased Creativity (Vol. 4: 294.)
128. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between High EEG Coherence and Flexibility of Concept Learning (Vol. 3: 219.)
129. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between Neurological Efficiency and Flexibility of Concept Learning (Vol. 3: 219.)
130. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between High EEG Coherence and Superior Academic Performance (Vol. 3: 230, 231)
131. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between Neurological Efficiency and Superior Academic Performance (Vol. 3: 230, 231.)
132. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between High EEG Coherence and Improved Performance in Mathematics (Vol. 3: 221.)
133. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between Changes in EEG Coherence and Increased Moral Maturity (Vol. 4: 294.)
134. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between Changes in EEG Coherence and Increased Intelligence (Vol. 4: 294)
135. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between Changes in EEG Coherence and Improved Academic Performance (Vol. 4: 294.)
136. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between Changes in EEG Coherence and Decreased Neuroticism (Vol. 4: 294.)
137. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between High EEG Coherence and a Unified Cosmic Perspective on Life (Vol. 3: 223.)
138. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between High Levels of Principled Moral Reasoning and a Unified Cosmic Perspective on Life (Vol. 3: 223.)
139. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between High EEG Coherence and More Ideal Social Behavior (Vol. 4: 297)
140. Correlations Found in Subjects Transcending Between High EEG Coherence and Self-Esteem (Vol. 5: 370.)
141. Increased Age-Related Psychological Variables (Vol. 3: 225.)
142. Increased Neurological Efficiency (Vol. 2: 114, 116; Vol. 3: 214, 251; Vol. 5:)
143. Increased Efficiency of Information Transfer in the Brain (Vol. 2: 114, 116; Vol. 3: 214, 251; Vol. 5: 374.)
144. Improved Spinal Reflex Activity (Vol. 3: 226, 227,229.)
145. Improvements in Reaction-Time Measures Which are Correlated with Intelligence (Vol. 5: 390.)
146. Greater Ability to Process Information at Speed (Vol. 2: 123.)
147. Improved Left Hemispheric Functioning (Vol. 1: 54–56, 58, 62, 63, 103; Vol. 2: 134; Vol. 3: 260, 265; Vol. 5: 387, 389, 390, 392.)
148. Improved Verbal Thinking (Vol. 1: 54–56, 58, 62, 63, 103; Vol. 2: 134; Vol. 3: 260, 265; Vol. 5: 387, 389, 390, 392.)
149. Improved Analytical Thinking (Vol. 1: 54–56, 58, 62, 63, 103; Vol. 2: 134; Vol. 3: 260, 265; Vol. 5: 387, 389, 390, 392.)
150. Improved Right Hemispheric Functioning (Vol. 1: 103; Vol. 2: 135, 140; Vol. 3: 257, 260; Vol. 5: 393.)
151. Improved Synthetic Thinking (Vol. 1: 103; Vol. 2: 135,140; Vol. 3: 257, 260; Vol. 5)
152. Improved Holistic Thinking (Vol. 1: 103; Vol. 2: 135,140; Vol. 3: 257, 260; Vol. 5: 393.)
153. Increased Sensitivity of the Nervous System (Vol. 4: 301.)
154. Increased Strength of the Nervous System (Vol. 4: 301.)
155. Increased Flexibility of the Nervous System (Vol. 4: 301.)
156. Greater Adaptability of Brain Functioning (Vol. 2: 120.)
157. More Order-Producing Brain Activity during Sleep (Vol. 5:373)
158. Increased Learning Ability (Vol. 5: 380.)
159. Greater Perceptual Flexibility (Vol. 5: 380.)
160. Increased Word Fluency in the Elderly (Vol. 5: 380.)
161. Faster Processing of Complex Information in the Elderly Measured by Event-Related Potentials (Vol. 5: 374.)
162. More Autonomic Stability (Vol. 1: 25–28, 87; Vol. 2: 123, 130; Vol. 3: 197,205; Vol. 5: 356.)
163. Lower Baseline Levels of Spontaneous Skin Resistance Responses (Vol. 5: 356.)
164. Lower Baseline Levels of Respiration Rate (Vol. 5: 356.)
165. Lower Baseline Levels of Heart Rate (Vol. 5: 356.)
166. Lower Baseline Levels of Plasma Lactate (Vol. 5: 356.)
167. More Autonomic Stability during Task Performance (Vol. 5: 399.)
168. More Effective Interaction w/ Environment (Vol. 1: 25–28; Vol. 2: 123; Vol. 5. 370)
169. Improved Resistance to Stress (Vol. 1: 25–28; Vol. 2: 123; Vol. 5. 370.)
170. Improved Temperature Homeostasis (Vol. 1: 31.)
171. More Efficient Neuroendocrine Regulation (Vol. 5: 364.)
172. Normal Neuroendocrine Reactivity (Vol. 5: 368.)
173. Healthy Neuroendocrine Pattern (Vol. 5: 368.)
174. Improved Stress Reactivity (Vol. 5: 367.)
175. Lower Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Sensitivity (Vol. 5: 367.)
176. Lower Blood Reactivity to Stress (Vol. 5: 367.)
177. Lower Resting Blood Pressure (Vol. 5: 367.)
178. Lower Resting Epinephrine Level (Vol. 5: 367.)
179. Lower Hospital Admissions Rate for Diseases of the Nervous System(Vol. 5: 378.)
180. Reduced Frequency and Severity of Epileptic Seizures (Vol. 3: 202.)
181. Reduction of Abnormal EEG Features in Epileptic Patients (Vol. 3: 202.)
182. Normalization of Neurotransmitter Metabolite Levels in Epileptic Patients (Vol. 3: 202.)
183. Decreased Stuttering (Vol. 1: 43; Vol. 4: 298.)
184. Lower Urinary Free Cortisol Levels (Vol. 2: 109)
185. Increased Stability of Control of Hormone Levels (Vol. 3: 206; 363, 364; Vol. 5: 363, 364.)
186. Increased Sensitivity of Control of Hormone Levels (Vol. 3:306; 363, 364; Vol. 5: 363, 364.)
187. Increased Endrocrinological Efficiency (Vol. 5: 363, 364.)
188. Lower Baseline Levels of Pituitary Hormones (TSH, Growth Hormone, and Prolactin) with Maintenance of Adrenal, Thyroid Hormone and Insulin Levels in Long-Term TM Participants (Vol. 5: 363, 364.)
189. Increased Plasma Level of Arginine Vasopress Associated with Body Fluid Balance (Vol. 5: 366.)
190. Increased Plasma Level of Arginine Vasopressin Associated with Learning (Vol. 5: 366.)
191. Increased Plasma Level of Arginine Vasopressin Associated with Memory (Vol. 5: 366.)
192. Improved Glucose Tolerance (Vol. 3: 240; Vol. 4: 299.)
193. Improved Stress Reactivity (Vol. 5: 367.)
194. Lower Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Sensitivity (Vol. 5: 367.)
195. Lower Resting Epinephrine Level (Vol. 5: 367.)
196. Normal Neuroendocrine Reactivity (Vol. 5: 368.)
197. Meditating Type A Subjects Showed Healthy Neuroendocrine Pattern (Vol. 5: 368.)
198. Improved Blood Sugar in Diabetic Patients(Vol. 3: 238.)
199. Improvements in Patients with Menorrhagia (Vol.3: 238.)
200. Lower Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Levels Indicating Less Serious Illness and Slower Aging (Vol. 5: 377.)
201. Hormone Levels Indicating Younger Biological Age (Vol. 5: 376.)
202. Lower Hospitalizations for Infectious Diseases(Vol. 5: 378.)
203. Lower Health Care Utilization(Vol. 5: 378, 379.)
204. Benefits for Individuals with Allergies (Vol. 1: 2; Vol. 3: 238, 239.)
205. Fewer Infections (Vol. 1: 2; Vol. 3: 238, 239.)
206. Reduced Inflammation of the Gums(Vol. 1: 39; Vol. 3: 237, 238.)
207. Decreased Need for Anti-Histamines (Vol. 3: 247.)
208. A unique Pattern of DNA Repair (Vol. 5: 360, 413.)
209. Fewer Hospital Admissions for Bone Diseases (Vol. 5: 378.)
210. Fewer Hospital Admissions for Muscle Diseases (Vol. 5: 378.)
211. Improvements in Chronic Back Pain (Vol. 3: 238.)
212. Improvements in Rheumatoid Arthritis (Vol. 3: 238
213. Less Musculo-Skeletal System Complaints (Vol. 3: 238.)
214. Improvements in Perceptual/Motor Speed (Vol. 5: 393.)
215. Generally Improved Musculo-Skeletal System (Vol. 3: 241.)
216. Fewer Hospital Admissions for Gastro-Intestinal Disorders (Vol. 5: 378.)
217. Fewer Hospital Admissions for Irregularities of Metabolism (Vol. 5: 378.)
218. General Digestive System Improvements (Vol. 3: 239.)
219. Improved Periodontal Health (Vol. 1: 39; Vol. 3: 237, 238.)
220. Improvements in Patients with Dyspepsia (Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 3: 238.)
221. Improvements with Chronic Colitis (Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 3: 238.)
222. Improvements with Other Digestive System Complaints (Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 3: 238.)
223. Improved Auditory Thresholds (Vol. 1: 104; Vol. 3: 245, 246, 252; Vol. 4: 301, 302.)
224. Improved Auditory Discrimination (Vol. 1: 50; Vol. 2: 123, 128; Vol. 3: 256.)
225. Improved Efficiency of Visual Perception (Vol. 3: 253; Vol. 4: 300.)
226. Increased Freedom from Habitual Patterns of Perception (Vol. 3: 253; Vol. 4: 300.)
227. Lower Incidence of Perceptual Illusion (Vol. 2: 131.)
228. Increased Perceptual Flexibility(Vol. 1: 103; Vol. 3: 250, 253; Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
229. Increased Perceptual Speed (Vol. 3: 257.)
230. Increased Vigilance and Improved Capacity for Selective Attention (Vol. 3: 251; Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
231. Increased Field Independence (Vol. 1: 51, 52, 103; Vol. 3: 255, 257, 259; Vol. 4: 307; Vol. 5: 384, 389.)
232. Growth of a Stable Internal Frame of Reference (Vol. 1: 51, 52, 103; Vol. 3: 255, 257, 259; Vol. 4: 307; Vol. 5: 384, 389.)
233. Improved Perceptual/Motor Speed and Non-Verbal Intelligence (Vol. 5: 393.)
234. Reduction of Aging Effects as Assessed by Perceptual/Motor Speed (Vol. 5: 393.)
235. Faster Reactions (Vol. 1: 45–47, 53; Vol. 2: 129; Vol. 3: 248, 251, 254, 257; Vol. 4: 301; Vol. 5: 358, 390.)
236. Superior Perceptual-Motor Performance (Vol. 1: 48, 49.)
237. Increased Psycho-Motor Speed (Vol. 1: 103; Vol. 3: 250, 257; Vol. 5: 393.)
238. Increased Efficiency of Psycho-Motor Co-ordination (Vol. 3: 250.)
239. Improved Motor-Cognitive Flexibility (Vol. 1: 103.)
240. Improved Athletic Performance (Vol. 2: 130.)
241. Improved Neuromuscular Integration (Vol. 2: 130.)
242. Improved Running Speed (Vol. 2: 130.)
243. Improved Agility (Vol. 2: 130.)
244. Improved Standing Broad Jump (Vol. 2: 130.)
245. Correlations Found between Experiences of Higher States of Consciousness and Superior Performance in Perceptual Speed in Transcending Subjects (Vol. 3: 258.)
246. Correlations Found between Experiences of Higher States of Consciousness and Superior Performance in Flexibility in Transcending Subjects (Vol. 3: 258.)
247. Correlations Found between Experiences of Higher States of Consciousness and Superior Performance in Creativity in Transcending Subjects (Vol. 3: 258.)
248. Correlations Found between Experiences of Higher States of Consciousness and Superior Performance in Intelligence in Transcending Subjects (Vol. 3: 258.)
249. Correlations Found between Experiences of Higher States of Consciousness and Superior Performance in Field Independence in Transcending Subjects (Vol. 3: 258.)
250. Correlations Found between Experiences of Higher States of Consciousness and Superior Performance in Psycho-Motor Speed in Transcending Subjects (Vol. 3: 258.)
251. Fewer Medical Complaints during Pregnancy (Vol. 3: 234.)
252. Less Anxiety during Pregnancy (Vol. 3: 234.)
253. Less Anxiety during Childbirth (Vol. 3: 234.)
254. Less Pain during Pregnancy (Vol. 3: 234.)
255. Less Pain during Childbirth (Vol. 3: 234.)
256. Shorter Duration of Labor (Vol. 3: 234.)
257. Lower Frequency of Vacuum or Forceps Delivery (Vol. 3: 234.)
258. Lower Frequency of Other Operative Interventions during Labor (Vol. 3: 234.)
259. Increased Quiet Alertness in Newborns (Vol. 5: 381.)
260. Shorter Stay in the Hospital for Child Delivery (Vol. 5: 378.)
261. Greater Frequency of Breast-Feeding (Vol. 3: 234.)
262. Longer Duration of Breast-Feeding (Vol. 3: 234.)
263. Decreased Use of Cigarettes (Vol. 1: 80, 84; Vol. 2: 150, 153, 161–163; Vol. 3: 239, 247, 276, 280, 287; Vol. 5; 399.)
264. Decreased Use of Alcohol (Vol. 1: 73, 80, 83–85, 95; Vol. 2: 126, 150, 153, 162, 163; Vol. 3: 239, 247, 282, 283, 287; Vol. 4: 313; Vol. 5: 399.)
265. Decreased Drug Abuse(Vol. 1: 73, 79–82, 84–86, 89, 90, 95; Vol. 2: 153, 161–163; Vol. 3: 239, 247, 277, 282, 287; Vol. 5: 421.)
266. Decreased Intake of Caffeine (Vol. 2: 163; Vol. 3: 239.)
267. Increased Co-operation with Medical Advice (Vol. 3: 238.)
268. Fewer Hospital Inpatient Days in All Age Categories (Vol. 5: 378.)
269. Fewer Hospital Outpatient Visits in All Age Categories (Vol. 5: 378.)
270. Fewer Inpatient Admissions for All Major Categories of Disease (Vol. 5: 378.)
271. Lower Health Insurance Utilization Rates among MUM Faculty and Staff (Vol. 5: 379.)
272. Lower Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Levels Indicating Less Serious Illness (Vol. 5: 377.)
273. Maintenance of a Relaxed Style of Physiological Functioning Outside of Meditation (Vol. 1: 6, 18, 30; Vol. 3: 197; Vol. 5: 356.)
274. Maintenance of Physiological Relaxation during a Task (Vol. 2: 122; Vol. 5: 372, 399.)
275. Faster Recovery from Exertion(Vol. 1: 31, 53.)
276. Increased Energy and Endurance (Vol. 1: 62; Vol. 2: 130; Vol. 3: 238.)
277. Improvements in Sleeping and Dreaming Patterns (Vol. 1: 41, 42, 95; Vol. 3: 238, 243; Vol. 4: 313.)
278. Relief from Insomnia (Vol. 1: 41, 42, 95; Vol. 3: 238, 243; Vol. 4: 313.)
279. Decreased Time to Fall Asleep(Vol. 1: 41, 42; Vol. 2: 126, 160; Vol. 3: 278, 280; Vol. 4: 314.)
280. Decreased Awakenings per Night (Vol. 2: 126, 157, 160; Vol. 3: 278, 280; Vol. 4: 314.)
281. Improved Quality of Sleep (Vol. 2: 126, 157, 160; Vol. 3: 278, 280; Vol. 4: 314; Vol. 5: 399.)
282. Decreased Time to Awaken Fully (Vol. 2: 126.)
283. Increased Restedness on Awakening (Vol. 2: 126.)
284. Decreased Drowsiness (Vol. 2: 126, 147.)
285. Decreased Lethargy (Vol. 2: 126, 147.)
286. Decreased Daytime Napping (Vol. 2: 126.)
287. Decrease in Number of Dreams Remembered (Vol. 2: 126.)
288. Decrease in Complexity of Dreams (Vol. 2: 126.)
289. Decrease in Unpleasant Dreams (Vol. 2: 126.)
290. Decrease in Recurring Dreams (Vol. 2: 126.)
291. Increased Order-Producing Activity of the Brain during Sleep (Vol. 5: 373.)
292. Decreased Need for Sleep Medications(Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 2: 126, 153; Vol. 3: 238, 239, 247.)
293. Faster Recovery from Sleep Deprivation (Vol. 1: 40.)
294. Decreased Fatigue(Vol. 2: 147; Vol. 3: 238.)
295. Improvements in General Physical and Mental Well-Being in Individuals under Medical Care (Vol. 3: 238, 243.)
296. Improved Self-Health Rating (Vol. 1: 2; Vol. 3: 239, 247 Vol. 5: 399, 414.)
297. Decreased Susceptibility to, and Discomfort from, Physical and General Complaints (Vol. 3: 241.)
298. Benefits for Patients Recovering from Serious Illnesses (Vol. 3: 232, 238.)
299. Improved Mental and Physical Health in Patients on a Kidney Transplant/Dialysis Program (Vol. 2: 125.)
300. Fewer Domestic Accidents (Vol. 3: 239.)
301. Fewer Work Accidents (Vol. 3: 239.)
302. Fewer Road Accidents (Vol. 3: 239.)
303. Fewer Other Accidents (Vol. 3: 239.)
304. Improvements in Patients with Chronic Headaches (Vol. 1: 2, 95; Vol. 3: 238, 243.)
305. Decreased Need for Analgesics (Vol. 2: 150, 153; Vol. 3: 239, 247.)
306. Normalization of Body Weight (Vol. 3: 238, 290.)
307. More Successful Weight Reduction in Obese Subjects (Vol. 3: 238, 290.)
308. Changes towards Ideal Body Weight in Overweight Subjects (Vol. 1: 44; Vol. 3: 238.)
309. Changes towards Ideal Body Weight in Underweight Subjects (Vol. 1: 44; Vol. 3: 238.)
310. Improved Psychological Health in Subjects Undertaking Dietary Treatment for Obesity (Vol. 3: 290.)
311. Improvements in Patients with Skin Disorders (Vol. 3: 239.)
312. Less Eczema (Vol. 3: 239.)
313. Decreased Skin Disorders (Vol. 1: 95.)
314. Reduced Need for Medical Attention (Vol. 2: 126.)
315. Improvements in Physical Health Positively Correlated with Duration and Regularity of TM (Vol. 3: 247.)
316. Increased Longevity for the Elderly (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
317. Increased Cognitive and Perceptual Flexibility in the Elderly (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
318. Increased Behavioral Flexibility in the Elderly (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380)
319. Improved Mental Health in the Elderly (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 370, 371, 380, 395, 396.)
320. More Ideal Levels of Blood Pressure in the Elderly (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
321. Improvements in Mental Health in the Elderly(Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
322. Prevention of Psychiatric Illness (Vol. 2: 127.)
323. Improved Family Health (Vol. 5: 400.)
324. Healthier Glands Compared to the Norm (Orme-Johnson DW. Medical care utilization and the Transcendental Meditation program. Psychosomatic Medicine, 1987; 49:493-507)
325. Healthier Metabolism Compared to the Norm (Orme-Johnson DW. Medical care utilization and the Transcendental Meditation program. Psychosomatic Medicine, 1987; 49:493-507)
326. Healthier Immune System Compared to the Norm (Orme-Johnson DW. Medical care utilization and the Transcendental Meditation program. Psychosomatic Medicine, 1987; 49:493-507)
327. Healthier Eyes Compared to the Norm (Orme-Johnson DW. Medical care utilization and the Transcendental Meditation program. Psychosomatic Medicine, 1987; 49:493-507)
328. Healthier Skin Compared to the Norm (Orme-Johnson DW. Medical care utilization and the Transcendental Meditation program. Psychosomatic Medicine, 1987; 49:493-507)
329. Healthier Nails Compared to the Norm (Orme-Johnson DW. Medical care utilization and the Transcendental Meditation program. Psychosomatic Medicine, 1987; 49:493-507)
330. Healthier Hair Compared to the Norm (Orme-Johnson DW. Medical care utilization and the Transcendental Meditation program. Psychosomatic Medicine, 1987; 49:493-507)
331. Healthier Blood Compared to the Norm (Orme-Johnson DW. Medical care utilization and the Transcendental Meditation program. Psychosomatic Medicine, 1987; 49:493-507)
332. Healthier Spleen Compared to the Norm (Orme-Johnson DW. Medical care utilization and the Transcendental Meditation program. Psychosomatic Medicine, 1987; 49:493-507)
333. Faster Reactions (Vol. 1: 45–47; Vol. 2: 129; Vol. 3: 248, 251, 254, 257; Vol. 4: 301; Vol. 5: 358, 390.)
334. Increased Readiness for Activity (Vol. 1: 65; Vol. 2: 147.)
335. Increased Alertness (Vol. 1: 29; Vol. 2: 164; Vol. 4: 308.)
336. Increased Enthusiasm for Work (Vol. 2: 150; Vol. 5: 399.)
337. Increased Liveliness (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 3: 277, 290.)
338. Increased Vigor (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 3: 277.)
339. Increased Energy(Vol. 1: 62; Vol. 2: 130.)
340. Increased Endurance(Vol. 1: 62; Vol. 2: 130.)
341. Increased Persistence (Vol. 2: 153.)
342. Growth of a More Brave Nature(Vol. 1: 73.)
343. Growth of a More Adventurous Nature(Vol. 1: 73.)
344. Growth of a More Action-Oriented Nature (Vol. 1: 73.)
345. Increased Physical Well Being(Vol. 4: 308; Vol. 5: 380, 395.)
346. Increased Mental Well-Being (Vol. 4: 308; Vol. 5: 380, 395.)
347. Increased Psychological Health(Vol. 1: 64–78, 81, 87–95; Vol. 2: 141–161, 164, 165; Vol. 3: 266–275, 277–281, 283, 284, 288; Vol. 4: 308–316; Vol. 5: 370, 371, 380, 394–397, 399, 400.)
348. Lower Health Insurance Utilization for All Mental Disorders (Vol. 5: 378.)
349. Improvements on Mental Health Positively Correlated with Duration and Regularity of TM ( Vol. 3: 247.)
350. Prevention of Psychiatric Illness (Vol. 2: 127.)
351. Orientation toward Positive Values (Vol. 5: 394.)
352. Greater Sense of Well-Being (Vol. 5: 380, 395.)
353. Psychological Health Associated with Physiological
354. Indicators of Transcendental Consciousness (Vol. 5: 396.)
355. Decreased Anxiety (Vol. 1: 33, 35, 61, 62, 68, 71, 72, 74, 75, 78, 81, 84, 88–90, 92, 93, 95; Vol. 2: 125, 133, 138, 143, 145, 148, 150, 153, 154, 157, 160; Vol. 3: 234, 238, 268, 273, 275, 278, 280, 281, 284, 288, 290; Vol. 4: 308, 310, 311, 313, 314, 316; Vol. 5: 370, 399.)
356. Decreased Tension (Vol. 1: 65, 77, 81; Vol. 2: 150, 153, 157; Val. 3: 277, 281, 284; Vol. 4:308; Vol. 5: 399.)
357. Decreased Nervousness (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 2: 147; Vol. 3: 273, 277, 290; Vol. 4: 308, 316.)
358. Decreased Neuroticism (Vol. 1: 54, 55, 65, 67, 74, 77, 78, 92; Vol. 2: 137, 158; Vol. 3: 267, 269, 277, 278, 280; Vol. 4: 308, 310; Vol. 5: 370.)
359. Decreased Hidden Mental Turbulence (Vol. 3: 269.)
360. Decreased Somatic Neurotic Instability (Vol. I: 55.)
361. Decreased Psychosomatic Disturbance (Vol. I: 65, 77, 95; Vol. 3: 232, 241, 277, 290.)
362. Decreased Depression (Vol. 1: 65, 67, 74, 77, 78, 95; Vol. 2: 143, 147, 150, 158; Vol. 3: 238, 239, 268, 273, 277, 290; Vol. 4: 308, 313.)
363. Decreased Instability Symptoms (Vol. 2: 153.)
364. Decreased Hypochondriacal Symptoms (Vol. 2: 153.)
365. Decreased Neurasthenic Symptoms (Vol. 2: 153.)
366. Decreased Hypochondria (Vol. 1: 93.)
367. Decreased Sense of Physical Inadequacy (Vol. 1: 67.)
368. Decreased Vulnerability (Vol. 2: 147.)
369. Decreased Frustration (Vol. 2: 153.)
370. Decreased Irritability (Vol. 1: 65, 73, 77; Vol. 2 147, 158
371. Decreased General Maladjustment (Vol. 5: 371.)
372. Decreased Personality Disorder (Vol. 5: 371.)
373. Decreased Aggressiveness (Vol. 1: 65, 73, 74, 77, Vol. 2: 147, 158; Vol. 3: 284, 290; Vol. 4: 308.)
374. Decreased Hostility (Vol. 2: 142, 143, 158, 160, Vol.3: 278, 280; Vol.4: 314.)
375. Decreased Impulsiveness (Vol. 1: 71; Vol. 2: 138, 157; Vol. 4: 316.)
376. Increased Emotional Strength: Decreased Unwelcome Thoughts and Compulsive Behavior (Vol. 2: 150.)
377. Decreased Psychoticism (Vol. 1: 92.)
378. Increased Emotional Harmony (Vol. 2: 150.)
379. Absence of Regressive Behavior (Vol. 2: 150.)
380. Decreased Need for Tranquilizers (Vol. 1: 35, 95; Vol. 2:150, 153, 163; Vol.3: 238, 239, 243, 247, 267.)
381. Decreased Need for Anti-Depressants (Vol. 3: 247.)
382. Better Recall for Positive than Negative Words (Vol. 5: 394.)
383. Lower Recognition Thresholds for Positive Words than Negative Words (Vol. 5: 394.)
384. Differential Recognition Threshold for Positive and Negative Affect Terms Correlated with the Intensity of the Experienced Positive and Negative Affects (Vol. 5: 394.)
385. More Positive Appraisal of Others (Vol. 5: 394.)
386. Prevention of Psychiatric Illness (Vol. 2: 127.)
387. Improvements in Anxiety Neurosis (Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 2: 157; Vol. 3: 238.)
388. Improvements in Obsessive-Compulsive Neurosis (Vol.1: 95.)
389. Improvements in Depression (Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 3:238.)
390. Improvements in Psychosomatic Disorders (Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 3: 232.)
391. Improvements in Schizophrenia (Vol. 2: 157; Vol. 3: 281, 283.)
392. Improvements in Manic-Depressive Psychosis (Vol. 3: 281.)
393. Improvements in Addictive Disorders (Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 2: 157; Vol. 3: 83.)
394. Improvements in Alcoholism (Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 2: 157; Vol. 3: 83.)
395. Improvements in Drug Abuse (Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 2: 157; Vol. 3: 83.)
396. Improvements in Gambling (Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 2: 157; Vol. 3: 83.)
397. More Effective Rehabilitation of Patients following Discharge from a Vocational Rehabilitation Unit: Greater Ability to Maintain Employment (Vol. 3: 283.)
398. More Often Maintained on Out-Patient Care Alone (Vol. 3:283.)
399. Improvements in Personality Disorders (Vol. 2: 157; Vol. 3: 281.)
400. Decreased Overactive and Impulsive Behavior (Vol. 2: 157.)
401. Improvements in Aggressive Psychiatric Patients (Vol. 3: 202.)
402. Decreased Frequency of Attacks of Aggressive Behavior in Aggressive Psychiatric Patients (Vol. 3: 202.)
403. Decreased Severity of Attacks of Aggressive Behavior in Aggressive Psychiatric Patients (Vol. 3: 202.)
404. Normalization of Neurotransmitter Metabolite and Plasma Cortisol Levels (Vol. 3: 202.)
405. Improvements in Autism (Vol. 3: 262.)
406. Decreased Echolalic Behavior (Vol. 3: 262.)
407. Improved Social Behavior in Mentally Challenged Subjects (Vol. 3: 263.)
408. Improved Cognitive Functioning in Mentally Challenged Subjects (Vol. 3: 202, 263.)
409. Increased Intelligence in Mentally Challenged Subjects (Vol. 3: 202, 263.)
410. Improved Physical Health in Mentally Challenged Subjects (Vol. 3: 263.)
411. Normalization of Neurotransmitter Metabolite and Plasma Cortisol Levels in Mentally Challenged Subjects (Vol. 3: 202.)
412. Decreased Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (Vol. 4: 313)
413. Decreased Anxiety in War Veterans Suffering from PTSD (Vol. 4: 313.)
414. Decreased Anxiety in PTSD Patients(Vol. 4: 313.)
415. Decreased Depression in PTSD Patients (Vol. 4: 313.)
416. Decreased Alcohol Use in War Veterans Suffering from PTSD (Vol. 4: 313.)
417. Decreased Alcohol Use in PTSD Patients (Vol. 4: 313.)
418. Decreased Insomnia in PTSD Patients (Vol. 4: 313.)
419. Improved Employment Status in PTSD Patients (Vol. 4: 313.)
420. Decreased Family Problems in PTSD Patients (Vol. 4: 313.)
421. Decrease Marital Problems in War Veterans Suffering from PTSD(Vol. 4: 313.)
422. Decreased Startle Response in War Veterans Suffering from PTSD (Vol. 4: 313.)
423. Decreased Emotional Numbness in Veterans Suffering from PTSD (Vol. 4: 313.)
424. Reduced Severity of Delayed Stress Syndrome in War Veterans Suffering from PTSD (Vol. 4: 313.)
425. Improvements in Social Role Performance in War Veterans Suffering from PTSD (Vol. 4: 313.)
426. Increased Resilience in War Veterans Suffering from PTSD (Vol. 4: 313.)
427. Improved Academic Achievement in At-Risk Urban Middle School Students [CR[5] 400]
428. Increased Intelligence and Improved Self-Concept among Children from Low Income Families [CR 280]
429. Improved Academic Achievement in Secondary School Students [CR 271-273, 282, 397, 400]
430. Improved Academic Achievement in University Students [CR 271-273, 282, 397, 400]
431. Improved Academic Achievement in Postgraduate Students [CR 271-273, 282, 397, 400]
432. Higher Graduation Rates [CR 422]
433. Lower School Dropout [CR 422]
434. Higher College Acceptance Rates [CR 422]
435. Increased Social Maturity in College Students [CR 223]
436. Decreased Sleepiness in College Students [CR 178]
437. Decreased Total Psychological Distress in University Students [CR 25]
438. Decreased Anxiety in University Students [CR 25]
439. Decreased Depression in University Students [CR 25]
440. Decreased Anger in University Students [CR 25]
441. Decreased Hostility in University Students [25]
442. Decreased Blood Pressure in University Students [CR 25]
443. Improved Coping in University Students CR [25]
444. Decreased General Psychological Distress [CR 410]
445. Reduced Anxiety in Racial Ethnic Minority Secondary School Students [CR 410]
446. Reduced Anxiety in Ethnic Minority Secondary School Students [CR 410]
447. Greater Improvements in High School Students’ Speed Of Cognitive Processing Compared to a Traditional Chinese Meditation Technique or Napping [CR 266]
448. Greater Improvements in High School Students in Cognitive Flexibility Compared to a Traditional Chinese Meditation Technique or Napping [CR 266]
449. Greater Improvements in High School Students in Creativity Compared to a Traditional Chinese Meditation Technique or Napping [CR 266]
450. Greater Improvements in High School Students in General Intelligence Compared to a Traditional Chinese Meditation Technique or Napping [CR 266]
451. Greater Improvements in High School Students in Practical Intelligence Compared to a Traditional Chinese Meditation Technique or Napping [CR 266]
452. Greater Improvements in High School Students in Field Independence Compared to a Traditional Chinese Meditation Technique or Napping [CR 266]
453. Greater Improvements in High School Students in Reduced Anxiety Compared to a Traditional Chinese Meditation Technique or Napping [CR 266]
454. Improvements in Intellectual Performance (Problem-Solving Ability) Compared to Control Students [CR 277]
455. Improvements in Creativity Compared to Control Students [CR 277]
456. Improvements in Tolerance Compared to Control Students [CR 277]
457. Improvements in Self-Esteem Compared to Control Students [CR 277]
458. Improvements in Autonomy Compared to Control Students [CR 277]
459. Improvements in Independence Compared to Control Students [CR 277]
460. Improvements in Innovation Compared to Control Students [CR 277]
461. Improvements in Energy Compared to Control Students [CR 277]
462. Improved Ability to Deal With Abstract and Complex Situations [CR 277]
463. Decreased Student Anxiety Compared to Controls [CR 268-269, 277]
464. Increased Intelligence in Students Compared to Control Students [CR 268-269]
465. Increased Self-Esteem in Students Compared to Control Students [CR 268-269]
466. Improved Physical Health in Students Compared to Control Students [CR 268-269]
467. Decreased Depression in Students Compared to Control Students [CR 268-269]
468. Significantly Increased Ego-Development Using Loevinger’s Scale Compared to Controls [CR 203]
469. Significantly Higher Positive Ratings of Parents in Students’ Lives Compared to Controls [CR 226]
470. Significantly Higher Positive Ratings of Spouses in Students’ Lives Compared to Controls [CR 226]
471. Improved Performance on Standard Examinations After Six Months Compared to Controls [CR 271].
472. Improved Scores on English of the California Standard Tests Compared to Controls [CR 400]
473. Improved Scores on Mathematics Scales of the California Standard Tests Compared to Controls [CR 400]
474. Less Likely to Drop Out of School [CR 422]
475. Less Likely to Enter Prison [CR 422]
476. More Likely to Be Accepted at Post-Secondary Educational Institutions [CR 422]
477. Reductions in Absenteeism Compared to a Control Group who Participated in Health Education [CR 288]
478. Reductions in School Rule Infractions Compared to a Control Group who Participated in Health Education [CR 288]
479. Reductions in Suspension Days Compared to a Control Group who Participated in Health Education [CR 288]
480. Higher Scores on an Electroencephalographic (EEG) Index of Brain Integration in Students Compared Controls [CR 178]
481. Reduced Sleepiness in Students Compared to Non-Meditating Control [CR 178]
482. No Increase in Physiological Stress Levels (Measured by Skin Resistance Responses) Despite Impending Final Examinations, in Contrast to the Expected Increase Seen in Controls [CR 178]
483. Increased Self-Actualization in Economically Deprived Adolescents with Learning Problems (Vol. 2: 139.)
484. Increased Independence in Economically Deprived Adolescents with Learning Problems (Vol. 2: 139.)
485. Self-Supportiveness in Economically Deprived Adolescents with Learning Problems (Vol. 2: 139.)
486. Improved Self-Regard in Economically Deprived Adolescents with Learning Problems (Vol. 2: 139.)
487. Decreased Dropout Rate from School in Economically Deprived Adolescents with Learning Problems (Vol. 2: 139.)
488. Decreases in Anxiety in Children with Learning Problems (Vol. 2: 133.)
489. Decreases in Examination Anxiety in Children with Learning Problems (Vol. 2: 133.)
490. Decreases in School-Dislike in Children with Learning Problems (Vol. 2: 133.)
491. Decreased Stuttering (Vol. 1: 43; Vol. 4: 298.)
492. Decreased Overactive and Impulsive Behavior (Vol. 2: 157.)
493. Improvements in Autism (Vol. 3: 262.)
494. Decreased Echolalic Behavior (Vol. 3: 262.)
495. Increased Ability to See Man as Essentially Good (Vol. 1: 76; Vol. 2: 153; Vol. 3: 266; Vol. 5: 394.)
496. Increased Social Maturity (Vol. 2: 138; Vol. 3: 261; Vol. 5: 371.)
497. Greater Sense of Social Responsibility (Vol. 2: 138,158.)
498. Increased Sociability (Vol. 1: 65, 71, 73, 77; Vol. 2: 138; Vol. 3: 261, 266, 277, 290; Vol. 4: 316.)
499. Less Sense of Social Inadequacy (Vol. 3: 266.)
500. Decreased Social Introversion (Vol. 1: 87.)
501. Increased Outgoingness (Vol. 1: 73; Vol. 2: 150, 153.)
502. Increased Tendency to Participate (Vol. 1: 73; Vol. 2: 150, 153.)
503. Increased Capacity for Warm Interpersonal Relationships (Vol. 1: 69, 70, 73, 76, 77; Vol. 2: 149, 151,153; Vol. 3: 268, 277, 290; Vol. 4: 316.)
504. Increased Friendliness (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 3: 277, 290.)
505. Greater Respect for the Views of Others (Vol. 2: 164.)
506. Improved Ability to Appreciate Others (Vol. 3: 271.)
507. Greater Attentiveness to Others (Vol. 2: 164.)
508. Increased Ability to Co-operate with Others (Vol. 1: 73; Vol. 2: 161, 164.)
509. Improved Work and Personal Relationships (Vol. 5: 399.)
510. Decreased Tendency to Dominate (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 3: 268, 290.)
511. Increased Ability to Be Objective, Fair-Minded, and Reasonable (Vol. 4: 316.)
512. Increased Consideration for Others (Vol. 1: 71, 73; Vol. 2: 153.)
513. Increased Good-Naturedness, Friendliness, and Loyalty (Vol. 1: 73.)
514. Increased Ability to Express One’s Feelings Spontaneously (Vol. 1: 64, 69, 70, 76; Vol. 2: 151, 153; Vol. 4: 316.)
515. Increased Good Humor (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 3: 277, 290; Vol. 4: 308.)
516. Increased Trust (Vol. 1: 67; Vol. 2: 138, 150.)
517. Increased Tolerance (Vol. 1: 62, 65, 77; Vol. 2: 150, 153, 164; Vol. 3: 266, 268; Vol. 4: 308, 316.)
518. Growth of a More Sympathetic, Helpful, and Caring Nature (Vol. 1: 73; Vol. 2: 153; Vol. 4: 316.)
519. Greater Empathy (Vol. 2: 149.)
520. Increased Sensitivity to the Feelings of Others (Vol. 1: 73; Vol. 4: 304, 316.)
521. Growth of a More Tactful, Forgiving, and Agreeable Nature (Vol. 1: 73; Vol. 2: 153.)
522. Greater Regard for Etiquette (Vol. 2: 153.)
523. Increased Respectfulness (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 3: 290.)
524. Greater Tolerance of Authority (Vol. 2: 138.)
525. Greater Selectivity in Personal Relationships (Vol. 3: 268.)
526. Less Interest in Superficial Social Contacts (Vol. 3: 268.)
527. Effective Rehabilitation (Vol. 1: 87–89; Vol. 2: 158, 160, 161; Vol. 3: 278–280, 284–286; Vol. 4: 350, 352, 353; Vol. 5: 398, 420.)
528. Improved Family Life (Vol. 5: 400.)
529. Greater Adjustment (Vol. 2: 165; Vol. 4: 315.)
530. Greater Happiness (Vol. 2: 165.)
531. Greater Harmony (Vol. 2: 165.)
532. Greater Intimacy (Vol. 2: 165.)
533. Greater Acceptance of One’s Spouse (Vol. 2: 165.)
534. Greater Admiration of One’s Spouse (Vol. 2: 165.)
535. Greater Agreement on Conduct (Vol. 2: 165.)
536. Greater Agreement on Recreation (Vol. 2: 165.)
537. Increased Job Satisfaction (Vol. 1: 96, 97; Vol. 5: 399.) [CR 316-317]
538. Improved Relations with Co-Workers (Vol. 1: 96, 97) [CR 316-318]
539. Improved Relations with Supervisors (Vol. 1: 96, 97.)
540. Improved Job Performance (Vol. 1: 96, 97; Vol. 2: 161; Vol. 5: 399) [CR 317-318]
541. Increased Productivity (Vol. 1: 96, 97.) [CR 317]
542. Increased Employee Effectiveness [CR 316]
543. Greater Ability to Accomplish More with Less Effort (Vol. 2: 130, 164.)
544. Greater Organizational Ability (Vol. 2: 164.)
545. Greater Initiative (Vol. 2: 164.)
546. Greater Ability to Assign Priorities (Vol. 2: 164.)
547. Greater Decision Making Ability (Vol. 2: 164.)
548. Reduced Anxiety about Promotion (Vol. 1: 96.)
549. Reduced Job Worry and Tension (Vol. 5: 399.)
550. Improved Physiological Stability during Task Performance (Vol. 5: 399.)
551. Decreased Desire to Change Jobs (Vol. 1: 96.)
552. Increased Contribution of Managers to the Organization [CR 318]
553. Improved Leadership [CR 321]
554. Enhanced Management Development [CR 287, 322-334]
555. Improved Physical Health and Well-Being Of Employees [CR 61-62, 316, 318-320, 423]
556. Improved Mental Health and Well-Being of Employees [CR 61-62, 316, 318-320, 423]
557. Improved Health-Related Behavior in Employees [CR 62, 316, 318]
558. Improved Health-Related Behavior in Managers [CR 62, 316, 318]
559. Reduced Stress in Managers [CR 61, 316, 318, 320, 423]
560. Reduced Stress in Employees [CR 61, 316, 318, 320, 423]
561. Reduced Employee Job Tension [CR 61, 316, 319, 423]
562. Reduced Employee Anxiety [CR 61, 316, 319, 423]
563. Reduced Employee Depression [CR 61, 316, 319, 423]
564. Reduced Employee Insomnia [CR 61, 316, 319, 423]
565. Increased Employee Energy [CR 316, 318]
566. Decreased Employee Fatigue [CR 316, 318]
567. The following 50 benefits demonstrate that one percent of a population practicing the Transcendental Meditation program or the square root of one percent collectively practicing the TM-Sidhi program radiate a powerful influence of coherence and harmony in collective consciousness bringing life in accordance with all the laws of nature, neutralizing negative tendencies and promoting positive trends in society as a whole.) Decreased Incidence of Infectious Diseases (Vol. 4: 337, USA and Australia, 1983–1984.)
568. Improved Quality of National Life as Measured by an Index Including (Vol. 4: 332, USA, 1976–1983.)
569. Less Infectious Diseases (Vol. 4: 332, USA, 1976–1983.)
570. Lower Infant Mortality Rate (Vol. 4: 332, USA, 1976–1983.)
571. Lower Suicide Rate (Vol. 4: 332, USA, 1976–1983.)
572. Less Cigarette Consumption (Vol. 4: 332, USA, 1976–1983.)
573. Less Alcohol Consumption (Vol. 4: 332, USA, 1976–1983.)
574. Lower Divorce Rate (Vol. 4: 332, USA, 1976–1983.)
575. Fewer Traffic Fatalities (Vol. 4: 332, USA, 1976–1983.)
576. Lower Crime Rate (Vol. 4: 332, USA, 1976–1983.)
577. Lower Percentage of Civil Cases Reaching Trial (Vol. 4: 332, USA, 1976–1983.)
578. Higher Gross National Product (Vol. 4: 332, USA, 1976–1983.)
579. Higher Patent Application Rate (Vol. 4: 332, USA, 1976–1983.)
580. Higher Number of Degrees Conferred (Vol. 4: 332, USA, 1976–1983.)
581. Fewer Motor Vehicle Fatalities, Homicides (Vol. 5: 407, USA, 1979–1985; 408, Canada, 1983–1985.)
582. Fewer Suicides (Vol. 5: 407, USA, 1979–1985; 408, Canada, 1983–1985.)
583. Fewer Weekly Fatalities Due to Accidents Other than Motor Vehicle Fatalities (Vol. 5: 408, Canada, 1983–1985.)
584. Fewer Worker-Days Lost in Strikes (Vol. 5: 408, Canada, 1972–1986.)
585. Increased Positivity in National Mood (Vol. 4: 333, Israel, 1983.)
586. Less Pollution (Vol. 4: 321 and Vol. 5: 401, Rhode Island, USA, 1978.)
587. Lower Unemployment Rate (Vol. 4: 321 and Vol. 5: 401, Rhode Island, USA, 1978.)
588. Lower Total Crime Rate (Vol. 4: 321 and Vol. 5: 401, Rhode Island, USA, 1978.)
589. Less Fetal Deaths, Other Deaths, and Crime (Vol. 5: 401, Metro Manila Region, Philippines, 1979–1981.)
590. Decreased Suicide Rate (Vol. 4: 317, Cities, USA, 1973—1977; Vol. 4: 323 and Vol. 5: 407, USA, 1979–1985; 408, Canada, 1983–1985.)
591. Decreased Fires (Vol. 4: 333, Jerusalem, Israel, 1983.)
592. Decreased Motor Vehicle Accidents and Fatalities (Vol. 4: 317, Cities, USA, 1973–1977; 323, USA, 1979; 325, Holland, 1979; 327, USA, 1982; 333, Jerusalem, Israel, 1983; 337, USA, South Africa, and States of New South Wales, Victoria, and Western Australia, Australia, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 407, USA, 1979–1985; 408, Canada, 1983–1985.)
593. Decreased Air Traffic Fatalities and Fatal Accidents (Vol. 4: 323, USA, 1979; 337, Worldwide, 1983–1984.)
594. Decreased Crime (Vol. 1: 98, Cities, USA, 1973; Vol. 2: 166, Cities, USA, 1974–1976; Vol. 4: 318, Cities, USA, 1973–1978; Vol. 4: 319, Cities, USA, 1974–1976; Vol. 4: 320 and Vol. 5: 402, Metropolitan Areas, USA, 1973–1979; Vol. 4: 323, USA, 1979; Vol. 4: 325, Holland, 1979 and 1981; Vol. 4: 326 and Vol. 5: 401, Delhi, India, 1980–1981; Vol. 4: 328 and Vol. 5: 402, Washington, D.C., USA, 1981–1983; Vol. 4: 333, Jerusalem and Israel, 1983; Vol. 4: 334 and Vol. 5: 401, Puerto Rico, USA, 1984; Vol. 4: 337, State of Victoria, Australia, Washington, D.C., USA, and Karachi, Pakistan, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 401 Metro Manila, Philippines 1984–1985; Vol. 5: 408, Canada,1972–1986.)
595. Decreased Turbulence and Violence in Society (Vol. 4: 322, Iran, Nicaragua, and Rhodesia [Zimbabwe], 1978; Vol. 5: 410, Lebanon, 1983–1985.)
596. Decreased War Intensity and War Deaths (Vol. 4: 322, Worldwide, 1978; 331, Lebanon, 1982–1984; 333, Lebanon, 1983; 335, Lebanon, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 410, Lebanon, 1983–1985; 411, Worldwide, 1983–1985.)
597. Increased Progress towards Peaceful Resolution of Conflict (Vol. 4: 322, Worldwide, 1978; 335, Lebanon, 1983–1984; 337, Worldwide, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 409, USA, 1985–1987; 410, Lebanon, 1983–1985.)
598. Reduction of Conflict (Vol. 5: 410, Lebanon, 1983–1985.)
599. Increased Cooperation (Vol. 5: 410, Lebanon, 1983–1985.)
600. Reduced War Fatalities, and Reduced War Injuries (Vol. 5: 410, Lebanon, 1983–1985.)
601. More Positive, Evolutionary Statements and Actions of Heads of State (Vol. 4: 337, Worldwide, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 409, USA, 1985–1987.)
602. Increased Harmony in International Affairs (Vol. 4: 322, Worldwide, 1978; 337, Worldwide, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 409, USA, 1985–1987.)
603. Improved International Relations (Vol. 5: 411, Worldwide, 1983–1985.)
604. Reduced Conflict Globally (Vol. 5: 411, Worldwide, 1983–1985.)
605. Reduced Terrorism (Vol. 5: 411, Worldwide,1983–1985.)
606. Increase in World Index of Stock Prices (Vol. 5: 411, Worldwide, 1983–1985.) (Vol. 5: 411, Worldwide,1983–1985.)
607. Improved Economy (Vol. 5: 404–406, USA, 1979–1988; 403, USA and Canada, 1979–1988.)
608. Increased Economic Confidence (Vol. 4: 323, USA, 1979; 329, Washington, D.C., USA, 1981–1983; 330, United Kingdom, 1982–1983; 333, Israel, 1983; 335, Lebanon, 1984; 336, Worldwide, 1983–1984; 337, Worldwide, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 411, Worldwide, 1983–1985.)
609. Increased Economic Optimism (Vol. 4: 323, USA, 1979; 329, Washington, D.C., USA, 1981–1983; 330, United Kingdom, 1982–1983; 333, Israel, 1983; 335, Lebanon, 1984; 336, Worldwide, 1983–1984; 337, Worldwide, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 411, Worldwide, 1983–1985.)
610. Increased Economic Prosperity (Vol. 4: 323, USA, 1979; 329, Washington, D.C., USA, 1981–1983; 330, United Kingdom, 1982–1983; 333, Israel, 1983; 335, Lebanon, 1984; 336, Worldwide, 1983–1984; 337, Worldwide, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 411, Worldwide, 1983–1985.)
611. Improvement in Economic Indicators (Vol. 4: 323, USA, 1979; 329, Washington, D.C., USA, 1981–1983; 330, United Kingdom, 1982–1983; 333, Israel, 1983; 335, Lebanon, 1984; 336, Worldwide, 1983–1984; 337, Worldwide, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 411, Worldwide, 1983–1985.)
612. Increased Creativity as Measured by Increased Patent Application (Vol. 4: 337, USA, Australia, South Africa, and United Kingdom, 1983–1984.)
613. Fewer Notifiable Infectious Diseases (USA and Australia 1983-84) [CR 387]
614. Experience of Pure Consciousness during Transcending (Vol. 1: 2, 7, 8, 20, 21, 99–102; Vol. 3: 197, 213, 216, 218, 258.)
615. Scores on Psychological Health Associated with Physiological Indicators of Transcendence (Vol. 5: 396.)
616. More Frequent Experiences of Higher States of Consciousness (Vol. 5: 397.)
617. More Frequent Experiences of Transcendence (Vol. 5: 397.)
618. Growth of Higher States of Consciousness (Vol. 1: 19, 99–104; Vol. 3: 216, 258, 284; Vol. 4: 312; Vol. 5: 395. 397, 412, 418, 419, 423–430.)0
619. Physiological Correlates of Higher States of Consciousness Developed through Transcendence (Vol. 5: 412.)
620. Increased Self-Actualization through Transcendence (Vol. 1: 64, 67, 69, 70, 72, 74,7 6, 78; Vol. 2: 144, 151, 153, 155; Vol. 3: 239; Vol. 5: 395.)
621. Increased Integration through Transcendence (Vol. 1: 64, 67, 69, 70, 72, 74,7 6, 78; Vol. 2: 144, 151, 153, 155; Vol. 3: 239; Vol. 5: 395.)
622. Increased Unity through Transcendence (Vol. 1: 64, 67, 69, 70, 72, 74,7 6, 78; Vol. 2: 144, 151, 153, 155; Vol. 3: 239; Vol. 5: 395.)
623. Increased Wholeness of Personality through Transcendence (Vol. 1: 64, 67, 69, 70, 72, 74,7 6, 78; Vol. 2: 144, 151, 153, 155; Vol. 3: 239; Vol. 5: 395.)
624. Greater Ability to Bring Inner Self to Healthy Expression (Vol. 2: 141.)
625. Greater Commitment to Personal Growth (Vol. 2: 138.)
626. Increased Inner-Directedness (Vol. 1: 64, 69, 70, 72, 76; Vol. 2: 139, 151, 153, 155; Vol. 3: 268.)
627. Greater Independence (Vol. 1: 64, 69, 70, 72, 76; Vol. 2: 139, 151, 153, 155; Vol. 3: 268.)
628. Greater Self-Supportiveness (Vol. 1: 64, 69, 70, 72, 76; Vol. 2: 139, 151, 153, 155; Vol. 3: 268.)
629. Greater Inner Locus of Control (Vol. 1: 69.)
630. Growth of Inner Fulfillment Independent of Outside Stimulation (Vol. 3: 249.)
631. Increased Self-Sufficiency (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 2: 150, 153; Vol. 3: 277, 290; Vol. 4: 308.)
632. Increased Ego Strength (Vol. 1: 67; Vol. 2: 150, I53 .)
633. Increased Autonomy (Vol. 1: 62, 71; Vol. 2: 151, 153; Vol. 5: 395.)
634. Increased Independence (Vol. 1: 62, 71; Vol. 2: 151, 153; Vol. 5: 395.)
635. Increased Self-Reliance (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 2: 153; Vol. 3: 277.)
636. Increased Directedness (Vol. 5: 395.)
637. Increased Self-Satisfaction (Vol. 5: 371.)
638. Increased Moral-Ethical Self (Vol. 5: 371.)
639. Increased Social Self (Vol. 5: 371.)
640. Less Sensitivity to Criticism (Vol. 1: 67.)
641. Less Tendency to Worry about Other’s Opinions (Vol. 2: 164.)
642. Less Need to Belong and Be Accepted (Vol. 3: 268.)
643. Increased Self-Discipline (Vol. 4: 316.)
644. Greater Self-Control (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 2: 153; Vol. 3: 290; Vol. 4: 308)
645. Enhanced Self-Concept (Vol. 2: 142, 144, 146, 148, 156; Vol. 3: 274; Vol. 5: 371.)
646. Increased Self-Acceptance (Vol. 1: 70, 81; Vol. 2: 151.)
647. Increased Self-Confidence (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 2: 150; Vol. 3: 261, 277, 290; Vol. 4: 308.)
648. Increased Self-Assuredness (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 2: 150; Vol. 3: 261, 277, 290; Vol. 4: 308.)
649. Enhanced Inner Well-Being (Vol. 2: 147; Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380, 310.)
650. Increased Inner Calm (Vol. 1: 65, 73, 77; Vol. 2: 150; Vol. 4: 308, 316.)
651. Increased Tranquility (Vol. 1: 65, 73, 77; Vol. 2: 150; Vol. 4: 308, 316.)
652. Greater Calm in Frustrating Situations (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 4: 308, 316.)
653. Increased Contentment (Vol. 1: 65, 67, 77; Vol. 2: 150; Vol. 3: 277, 290; Vol. 4: 308.)
654. Increased Happiness (Vol. 1: 90; Vol. 2: 147.)
655. More Balanced Mood (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 3: 277; Vol. 4: 308.)
656. Increased Naturalness (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 3: 277, 290; Vol. 4: 308.)
657. Increased Spontaneity (Vol. 1: 64, 65, 69, 70, 76, 77; Vol. 2: 151, 153; Vol. 3: 277, 290; Vol. 4: 308, 316.)
658. Increased Emotional Stability (Vol. 1: 65, 71, 77, 87, 93, 95; Vol. 2: 138, 150, 153, 158; Vol. 3: 241, 273, 277, 290; Vol. 4: 308.)
659. Increased Emotional Maturity (Vol. 1: 65, 77, 87, 93, 95; Vol. 2: 150, 153, 158; Vol. 3: 290; Vol. 4: 308, 316.)
660. Increased Sensitivity to One’s Own Needs and Feelings (Vol. 1: 69, 70, 72; Vol. 2: 151, 153.)
661. Improved Adjustment (Vol. 1: 81.)
662. Greater Optimism (Vol. 2: 138.)
663. Increased Moral Maturity (Vol. 1: 91; Vol. 3: 265, 270; Vol. 4: 309; Vol. 5: 416.)
664. Increased Altruism (Vol. 1: 71, 73; Vol. 2: 138.)
665. Increased Intrinsic Spirituality (Vol. 5: 395.)
666. Greater Respect for Traditional Religious Values (Vol. 1: 71; Vol. 2: 138.)
667. Greater Satisfaction with One’s Moral Worth (Vol. 2: 156.)
668. Greater Satisfaction with One’s Relationship to God (Vol. 2: 156.)
669. Greater Satisfaction with One’s Religion (Vol. 2: 156.)
670. High Level of Moral Atmosphere in a High School Setting (Vol. 4: 309.)
671. Greater Open-Mindedness: Greater Flexibility of Constructions of Reality (Vol. 2: 152.)
672. Increased Ability to See the Opposites of Life as Meaningfully Related (Vol. 1: 76.)
673. Increased Ability to Connect Past and Present Meaningfully (Vol. 1: 69, 70, 76; Vol. 2: 151, 153, 155.)
674. Decreased Behavioral Rigidity (Vol. 1: 87, 103; Vol. 3: 250; Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5, 380.)
675. Improved Mental Health (Vol. 1: 64–78, 81, 87–95; Vol. 2: 141–161, 164, 165; Vol. 3: 266–275, 277–281, 283, 284, 288; Vol. 4: 308–316; Vol. 5: 370, 371, 380, 394–397, 399, 400.)
676. Improvements in Mental Health Positively Correlated with Duration and Regularity of Transcendence (Vol. 3: 247.)
677. Increased Social Outgoingness in Prison Inmates[6] (JOR 53)
678. Reduction in Anxiety in Prison Inmates [CR 343-344,347-348] (JOR 53,56)
679. Reduction in Depression in Prison Inmates (JOR 54)
680. Reduction in Prison Infractions in Prison Inmates (JOR 53)
681. Reduction in Use Of Cigarettes in Prison Inmates (JOR 53)
682. Reduction In Drugs In Prison Inmates (JOR 53)
683. Increased Positivity in Prison Inmates (JOR 56)
684. Less Escape Attempts by Prison Inmates (JOR 56)
685. Less Usage of Medical Resources by Inmates (JOR 56)
686. Significant Decrease of Cognitive Distortions in Prison Inmates (JOR 57)
687. Significant Increase in Intelligence Related Measures in Prison Inmates (JOR 56)
688. Increased Es Sprit De Corps Among Prison Officials and Security (JOR 56)
689. Increased respect for Superior Officers in Prison Inmates Among Prison Officials and Security (JOR 56)
690. Significant Increase In Positive Recreational Activities In Prison Inmates (JOR 53)
691. Significant Increase In Positive Educational Activities In Prison Inmates (JOR 53)
692. Significant Reduction In Tension In Prison Inmates (JOR 54)
693. Increase In Relaxation In Prison Inmates (JOR 54)
694. Significant Increase In Optimism In Prison Inmates (JOR 54)
695. Significant Increase In Self-Esteem In Prison Inmates (JOR 54)
696. Significant Increase In Inmate Emotional Stability(JOR 54)
697. Significant Increase In Maturity In Prison Inmates (JOR 54)
698. Significant Reduced Inmate Neuroticism [CR 343-344] (JOR 54)
699. Reduced Aggression In Prison Inmates [CR 360, 403] (JOR 54)
700. Significant Reduction In Inmate State Anxiety [CR 347-348] (JOR 55)
701. Significant Reduction in Inmate Trait Anxiety [CR 347-348] (JOR 54 – 55)
702. Significant Reduction In Negativism In Inmates [CR 343-344]
703. Better Quality Of Sleep In Prison Inmates [CR 343-344] (JOR 55)
704. Stable Condition of Mind and Personality in Inmates (JOR 55)
705. Integrated Condition of Mind and Personality in Inmates (JOR 55)
706. Significant Reduction In Hostility In Prison Inmates (JOR 54)
707. Less Heavy Smoking In Prison Inmates (JOR 53)
708. Less Insomnia In Prison Inmates [CR 343-344]
709. Significant Reduction In Inmate Obsession/Compulsion (JOR SI)
710. Significant Reduction In Rule Infractions In Inmates (JOR 54)
711. Significant Reduction in Paranoid Anxiety in Inmates (JOR 55)
712. Significant Reduction In Sleep Disorders In Inmates [CR 343-344]
713. Significant Reduction In Verbal Hostility in Inmates [CR 343-344]
714. Significant Reduction In Stress In Prison Inmates [CR 343-344]
715. Significant Reduction In Inmate Psychopathy [CR 347-348] [343-344]
716. Significant Reduction In Inmate Recidivism (JOR 55, 56, 57)
717. Significant Reduction in Inmate Tendency to Assault [CR 343-44]
718. Significant Increase In Inmate Self Development Higher Ego Development In Prison Inmates (JOR 55)
719. Significant Decrease In Resentment In Prison Inmates [343-344]
720. Significant Decrease In Suspicion in Prison Inmates [343-344]
721. Significant Decrease in Criminal Thinking In Inmates (OR[7] 1)
722. Significant Decrease in Mood Disturbance In Inmates (OR 1)
723. Significant Decrease in Perceived Stress In Inmates (OR 1)
724. Significant Decrease in Trauma Symptoms In Inmates (OR 1)
725. Significant Decrease in Entitlement In Prison Inmates (OR 1)
726. Significant Decrease in Justification In Prison Inmates (OR 1)
727. Significant Decrease in Cold-Heartedness in inmates (OR 1)
728. Significant Decrease in Power Orientation In Inmates (OR 1)
729. Significant Decrease in Criminal Rationalization In Prison Inmates(OR 1)
730. Significant Decrease in Personal Irresponsibility In Prison Inmates (OR 1)
731. Decrease in Confusion/Bewilderment in Prison Inmates (OR 1)
732. Significant Decrease in Fatigue In Prison Inmates (OR 1)
733. Significant Increase in Spiritual Well-Being in Inmates (OR 1)
734. Significant Increase in Vigor in Prison Inmates (OR 1)
735. Improved Social Behavior in Juvenile Offenders [351-352]
736. Reduced Anxiety in Juvenile Offenders [351- 352]
737. Increased Self-Regard in Juvenile Offenders [351-352]
738. Increased Motivation in Prison Inmates (JOR 53)
739. Increased Self-Improvement in Prison Inmates (JOR 53)
740. Decreased Pathological Symptoms in Prison Inmates (JOR 55)
741. Valuable in Criminal Rehabilitation as a Sole Treatment Program (JOR 65)
742. Valuable as an Addition to Existing Criminal Rehabilitation Programs (JOR 65)
743. Valuable in Substance Abuse as a Sole Treatment Program (JOR 65)
744. Valuable in Substance Abuse as an Addition to Existing Programs (JOR 65)
745. Inmate Reductions in a Dependent Orientation That Is Commonly Found In Criminals [347-348]
746. Inmate Reductions in an Exploitative Orientation That Is Commonly Found In Criminals [347-348]
747. More Responsible Orientation that is Commonly Found in Law Abiding Citizens [347-348]
748. More Self-Monitoring Orientation that is Commonly Found in Law Abiding Citizens [347-348]
749. More Self-Respecting Orientation that is Commonly Found in Law Abiding Citizens [347-348]
750. More Communicative Orientation that is Commonly Found in Law Abiding Citizens [347-348].
751. Less Resentment in Maximum Security Prisoners Compared to Controls [CR 343-344]
752. Less Negativism in Maximum Security Prisoners Compared to Controls[CR 343-344]
753. Less Suspicion in Maximum Security Prisoners Compared to Controls [CR 343-344]
754. Less Neuroticism in Maximum Security Prisoners Compared to Controls [CR 343-344]
755. Less Tendency to Assault in Maximum Security Prisoners Compared to Controls [CR 343-344]
756. Little Rise in Health Care Needs with Advancing Age (CR 4)
757. 87% Less Hospital Admission for Heart Disorders (CR 4)
758. 87% Less Admissions for Blood Vessel Disorders (CR 4)
759. 55% Less Hospital Admission for Tumors (CR 4)
760. 73% Less Hospital Admission for Respiratory Disorders (CR 4)
761. 87% Less Hospital Admission for Neurological Problems (CR 4)
762. 30% less Hospital Admission for infections (CR 4)
763. 59% Lower Overall Medical Expenditure than Norms (CR 5)
764. 57% Lower Overall Medical Expenditure than Controls (CR 5)
765. 80% Fewer Hospital Admissions (CR 5))
766. 55% Fewer Out-Patient Visits to the Doctor (CR 5)
767. 88% Fewer Days in Hospital than Controls (CR 5)
768. 92% Lower Hospital Admissions for Immune Disorders (CR 5)
769. 92% Lower Hospital Admissions for Endocrine Disorders (CR 5)
770. 92% Lower Hospital Admissions for Metabolic Disorders (CR 5)
771. 92% Lower Admissions for Cardiovascular Disease (CR 5)
772. 92% Lower Admissions for Mental Health Issues (CR 5)
773. 92% Lower Admissions for Substance Abuse (CR 5)
774. 92% Lower Hospital Admission for Substance Abuse (CR 5)
775. 94% Lower Admissions for Musculoskeletal Disorders (CR 5)
776. A Progressive Decline in Medical Expenditures for Doctors Compared to Controls (CR 6-7)
777. An Average 13% Annual Difference in Medical Expenditures for Doctors Trending Towards a Cumulative Reduction Of 55% after 6 Years (CR 6-7)
778. For High-Cost Subjects, 11% Decrease in Medical Expenditures for Doctors over 1 Year, with a Cumulative Reduction of 28% after 5 Years Compared to Controls (CR 399)
779. For Older Individuals, a 70% Cumulative Cost Reduction after 5 Years (CR 8)
780. A 57% Reduction in Medical Expenditures (in Conjunction with Maharishi’s Vedic Approach to Health) (CR 5)
781. A 48% Reduction in the Rate of Major Clinical Events (CR 9)
782. Reduced Psycho-social Distress (CR 9)
783. Clinically Significant Reductions in Systolic Blood Pressure without Adverse Side-Effects (CR 9-18, 22-25, 32-45, 413-414)
784. Clinically Significant Reductions in Diastolic Blood Pressure without Adverse Side-Effects (CR 9-18, 22-25, 32-45, 413-414)
785. More Effective in Reducing Mild Hypertension than either Progressive Muscular Relaxation, a Pseudo-Meditation Procedure (which Attempted to Imitate TM) (CR 10-12, 32).
786. More Effective in Reducing Mild Hypertension than A ‘Usual Care’ Program of Advice on Weight Loss, Salt Restriction, Exercise, and Alcohol Intake (CR 10-12, 32).
787. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Men in High Risk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Psycho-social Stress (CR 11)
788. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Men in High Risk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Obesity (CR 11)
789. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Men in High Risk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Alcohol Use (CR 11)
790. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Men in High Risk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Physical Inactivity (CR 11)
791. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Men in High Risk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Sodium-Potassium Ratio (CR 11)
792. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Men in High Risk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Dietary Composite Measures (CR 11)
793. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Men in Low-Risk Groups the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Psycho social Stress (CR 11)
794. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Men in Low-Risk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Obesity (CR 11)
795. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Men in Low-Risk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Alcohol Use (CR 11)
796. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Men in Low-Risk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Physical Inactivity (CR 11)
797. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Men in Low-Risk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Sodium-Potassium Ratio (CR 11)
798. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Men in Low-Risk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Dietary Composite Measures (CR 11)
799. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Women in HighRisk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Psycho-social Stress (CR 11)
800. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Women in HighRisk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Obesity (CR 11)
801. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Women in High Risk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Alcohol Use (CR 11)
802. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Women in High Risk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Physical Inactivity (CR 11)
803. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Women in High Risk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Sodium-Potassium Ratio (CR 11)
804. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Women in High Risk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Dietary Composite Measures (CR 11)
805. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Women in LowRisk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Psycho-social Stress (CR 11)
806. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Women in LowRisk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Obesity (CR 11)
807. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Women in LowRisk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Alcohol Use (CR 11)
808. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Women in LowRisk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Physical Inactivity (CR 11)
809. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Women in LowRisk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Sodium-Potassium Ratio (CR 11)
810. Effective in Lowering Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure for Women in LowRisk Groups on the Measure of Hypertension Risk: Dietary Composite Measures (CR 11)
811. Favorably Cost-Effectiveness for Reducing High Blood Pressure Compared to Drugs (CR 14)
812. A 23% Reduction in All-Cause Mortality (CR 15-17)
813. A 30% Decrease in Cardiovascular Deaths (CR 15-17)
814. In Patients with Stable Coronary Heart Disease (CHD),
815. Decreased Blood Pressure and Insulin Resistance – a Key Component of the ‘Metabolic Syndrome’ Associated with Many Major Disorders of Modern Society, including CHD, Type 2 Diabetes, and Hypertension In Patients with Stable Coronary Heart Disease [CHD](CR 18)
816. Decreased Insulin Resistance – a Key Component of the ‘Metabolic Syndrome’ (CR 18)
817. Increased Stability Of The Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System (CR 18)
818. Reduced Carotid Artery Atherosclerosis Compared to Control Groups Who Practiced Progressive Muscular Relaxation (CR 19-20)
819. Reduced Carotid Artery Atherosclerosis Compared to Control Groups Who Received Health Education (CR 19-20)
820. Improved Functional Capacity in Patients w/ Chronic Heart Failure (CR 21)
821. Improved Quality of Life in Patients w/ Chronic Heart Failure (CR 21)
822. Lower Depression in Patients w/ Chronic Heart Failure (CR 21)
823. Less Hospitalizations for Patients w/ Chronic Heart failure (CR 21)
824. Decreased Left Ventricular Mass in Pre-Hypertensive Adolescents Compared to Controls (CR 408)
825. Reduced Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Post-Menopausal Women [CR 28]
826. Reduced Levels of the Stress Hormone Cortisol in Post-Menopausal Women [CR 28]
827. Reduced Cholesterol Levels Independent to Changes in Weight [CR 29-30, 320]
828. Reduced Cholesterol Levels Independent to Changes in Diet [CR 29-30, 320]
829. Reduced Cholesterol Levels Independent to Changes in Medication [CR 29-30, 320]
830. More Effective Weight Reduction Obese Subjects on a Weight Reducing Diet [CR 31]
831. Improved Psychological Health In Obese Subjects On A Weight Reducing Diet [CR 31]
832. Rapid, Clinically Significant Blood Pressure Reductions (CR 52)
833. More Effective in Reducing Blood Pressure than other Meditation Practices (CR 52)
834. More Effective in Reducing Blood Pressure than Relaxation Procedures (CR 52)
835. Documented Acceptability and Effectiveness in Reducing Blood Pressure for a Wide Range of Populations (CR 52)
836. Effective in Reducing High Blood Pressure when Used as Sole Treatment (CR 52)
837. Effective in Reducing High Blood Pressure when Used in Concert with Medication (CR 52)
838. Reduces High Blood Pressure in ‘Real-Life’ Environments Outside the Clinic (CR 52)
839. Substantially Reduced Rates of Major Clinical of Death, Heart Attack and Stroke [CR 9]
840. Improves Multiple Factors Relevant to Cardiovascular Health, Which Likely Contribute to the Technique’s Observed Preventive Effects [CR 34-50, 55, 409, 413-414]
841. Recognized And Recommended for Consideration by a National Medical Organization that Provides Professional Practice Guidelines to Physicians, Health Care Payers, and Policymakers [CR 414]
842. Improvements in Both General and HIV-Specific Health- Related Quality of Life Compared to Control Subjects Who Received Education on Healthy Eating [CR 415]
843. Improved Total and General Health Scores on Functional Assessment of HIV Infection Compared to Controls [CR 415]
844. Increased Vitality and Physical Well-Being Compared to Controls [CR 415]
845. Improved Quality of Life in Patients w/ Breast Cancer [CR 53, 9, 21, 59; 65-94; 415]
846. Improved Quality of Life in Patients w/ Coronary Heart Disease [CR 53, 9, 21, 59; 65-94; 415]
847. Improved Quality of Life in Patients w/ Heart Failure [CR 53, 9, 21, 59; 65-94; 415]
848. Improved Quality of Life in Patients w/ HIV [CR 53, 9, 21, 59; 65-94; 415]
849. Improved Quality of Life in Patients w/ Chronic Renal Failure [CR 53, 9, 21, 59; 65-94; 415]
850. Improved Mental Health In Patients w/ Breast Cancer [CR 53, 9, 21, 59; 65-94; 415]
851. Improved Mental Health In Patients w/ Coronary Heart Disease [CR 53, 9, 21, 59; 65-94; 415]
852. Improved Mental Health In Patients w/ Heart Failure [CR 53, 9, 21, 59; 65-94; 415]
853. Improved Mental Health In Patients w/ HIV [CR 53, 9, 21, 59; 65-94; 415]
854. Improved Mental Health In Patients w/ Chronic Renal Failure [CR 53, 9, 21, 59; 65-94; 415]
855. Decreased Atherosclerosis [CR 19-20]
856. Decreased Heart Failure [CR 21]
857. Decreased Reflex Latency (Monosynaptic Reflex) [CR 197]
858. Decreased Reflex Recovery Time (Paired H-Reflex) [CR 198]
859. Muscular Contraction Time (Fast and Mixed Muscles) [CR 197]
860. Sleep Disturbance (Awakenings per Night) [CR 343-344, 67-68; 56, 62]
861. Daytime Sleep [CR 68, 178]
862. Increased Vital Capacity [CR 314-315]
863. Increased Cerebral Blood Flow [CR 124, 127, 166]
864. Increased EEG Alpha Power [CR 110-113, 115-119, 151-160, 162, 169, 402, 416]
865. Decreased Serum Cholesterol [CR 29-30, 318]
866. Decreased Insulin Resistance [CR 18]
867. Increased DHEA-S (Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate) [CR 99]
868. Increased Efficiency of Endocrine Control (Pituitary-Thyroid Axis) [CR 193]
869. Increased Visual Perception [CR 12, 184, 276, 308]
870. Increased Dichotic Listening [CR 306]
871. Increased Complex Sensory-Motor Performance [CR 310-311]
872. Decreased Auditory Threshold [CR 96-97, see also 1-2]
873. Decreased Behavioral Rigidity [CR 12, 309]
874. Decreased Reaction Time – Simple [CR 101, 296, 314-315]
875. Decreased Reaction Time – Complex [CR 297, 184]
876. Increased Fluid Intelligence [CR 266-267, 270, 275, 101]
877. IncreasedCreativity [CR 266, 277-278, 283]
878. IncreasedLearning Ability [CR 12, 279, 284]
879. Increased Memory – Verbal [CR 284]
880. Increased Memory – Visual [CR 101]
881. Increased Organization Of Memory [CR 285]
882. Decreased Rise In Health Care Needs w/ Advancing Age [CR 4]
883. Decreased Rise In Health Care Costs w/Advancing Age [CR 8]
884. Significantly Younger Chronological Age in Advancing Age Compared to Controls [CR 95]
885. Significantly Younger Biological Age in Advancing Age Compared to Controls [CR 95]
886. Significantly Younger Chronological Age in a Younger Population Compared to Controls [CR 96-97]
887. Significantly Younger Biological Age in a Younger Population Compared to Controls [CR 96-97]
888. Reduced Cardiovascular in Elderly African Americans w/ Mild High Blood pressure [CR 16].
889. Reduced All-Cause Mortality in Elderly African Americans w/ Mild High Blood pressure [CR 16].
890. Reflected DHEAS Levels in Individuals Practicing TM Comparable to Levels of Non-Meditators Who are 5-10 Years Younger (a Difference Not Explained by Variations in Diet, Weight, or Exercise [CR 99].
891. Significantly Lower Free Radical Activity Compared to Controls (at All 12 Anatomical Sites) [CR 106-107]
892. Significantly Lower Free Radical Activity Compared to Practitioners of other Types of Meditation (at 11 out of 12 Sites) [CR 106-107]
893. Compared to Non-Meditating Controls, Free Radical Activity Was 27% Lower Compared to 17% Lower in Practitioners of Other Techniques [CR 106-107]
894. Lower Blood Levels of Lipid Peroxides (an Index of Free Radical Activity) in Elderly People Who Practiced TM Compared to Non-Meditating Peers [CR 108]
895. Decreased Peripheral Vascular Resistance [CR 128]
896. High Galvanic Skin Resistance [CR 110-112, 114, 121, 131, 314]
897. Stable Galvanic Skin Resistance [CR 110-112, 114, 121, 131, 314]
898. Reduced Arterial Blood Lactate [CR 110-112, 114, 122, 124, 126]
899. Deep Muscle Relaxation [CR 150, 158]
900. Gives Rise to a Fourth Major State of Consciousness – Transcendental Consciousness – which is Both Experientially and Physiologically Distinct from Waking, Sleeping, and Dreaming [CR 111, 115-119, 129-130,151, 155-156, 161-162, 416]
901. Increased Wakefulness During TM [CR 110-113, 115-119, 130, 151-164, 167-168, 407, 416]
902. Enhanced Integration between Different Areas of the Brain During TM [CR 115-119, 151-164, 402-404, 416]
903. High EEG Coherence between Front and Back of the Brain [CR 115, 119, 130, 151, 154-156, 159-160, 162, 170, 403-404, 416]
904. High EEG Coherence between Right and Left Cerebral Hemispheres [CR 115, 119, 130, 151, 154-156, 159-160, 162, 170, 403-404, 416]
905. High Levels of Alpha-1 Activity Spread Globally over the Cerebral Cortex, Indicating that TM Brings the Whole Brain to a State of Restful Alertness[CR 119]
906. Widespread EEG Alpha Brain Wave Activity during TM [CR 153]
907. Reductions in Physiological and Biochemical Correlates of Stress [CR 189-196, 359, 365]
908. Reduced Distress Associated w/ Painful Stimuli, w/o Impairing Sensory Acuity [CR 179]
909. Three Times As Effective As other Mediation Procedures in Increasing Self-Actualization, an Overall Measure of Positive Mental Health and Personal Development. [CR 201, 203-238]
910. Three Times As Effective As Relaxation Procedures in Increasing Self-Actualization, an Overall Measure of Positive Mental Health and Personal Development. [CR 201, 203-238]
911. Exceptionally Effective in Developing Emotional Maturity [CR 201, 203-238]
912. Exceptionally Effective in Developing a Resilient Sense of Self [CR 201, 203-238]
913. Exceptionally Effective in Developing a Positive, Integrated Perspective of Self [CR 201, 203-238]
914. Exceptionally Effective in Developing a Positive, Integrated Perspective of the World [CR 201, 203-238]
915. Significant Reduction in the Use of Hard Drugs (JOR 58)
916. 90% Reduction in Drug Dealing (JOR 58)
917. Spontaneous Reduced Usage of Drugs in Beginning and Long Term Users (JOR 58)
918. 58% Reduced Marijuana Use (JOR 59, 60)
919. 91% Reduced Hallucinogen Use (JOR 59, 60)
920. 96% Reduced Amphetamine Use (JOR 59)
921. 96% Reduced Barbiturate Use (JOR 59, 60)
922. 78% Reduced Opiate Use (JOR 60)
923. 50% Reduced Use of Other Drugs (JOR 59)
924. Less Dependence on Harmful Drugs Compared to Equally Motivated Controls (JOR 59)
925. Reduces Motivation to Use Drugs (JOR 60)
926. 81% Reduced Cigarette Smoking (JOR 64)
927. More than Twice as Effective in Reducing Cigarette Smoking Compared to Preventative Education Programs (SR 62)
928. Three Times as Effective in Reducing Cigarette Smoking Compared to Pharmacological Treatments (SR 62)
929. Four times as Effective in Reducing Cigarette Smoking Compared to Smoking Cessation Counseling (SR 62)
930. Nine Times as Effective in Reducing Cigarette Smoking Compared to Printed Self Help Materials (SR 62)
931. More than Twice as Effective in Reducing Cigarette Smoking Compared to Unconventional Treatments (SR 62)
932. Effectively Reduces Smoking Over the Long Term Compared to Other Popular Smoke Reduction Programs that Commonly have Only Short Term Effects (JOR 64)
933. As Spontaneously Effective in Reducing Smoking As a Deliberate Smoking Cessation Program (JOR 60)
934. More Rapid Progress in Drug Rehabilitation (JOR 60)
935. Three Times More Effective than Relaxation Programs in Reducing Alcohol Use (SR 60)
936. Significantly More Effective than Preventive Programs Counteracting Peer Influence in Reducing Alcohol Use (SR 60)
937. Eight Times More Effective than Other Preventative Education Programs in Reducing Alcohol Use (SR 60)
938. Over Five Times More Effective than Driving Under the Influence Programs in Reducing Alcohol Use (SR 60)
939. Reduces Need for Stimulants (JOR 60, 62)
940. Reduces Risk Factors for Substance Abuse in a Highly Peer-influenced Age Group (JOR 60)
941. Effective and Appropriate Drug Treatment for Disadvantaged and Chronically Addicted Populations (JOR 60)
942. A Meta-Support System that Helps Recovering Patients Make Better Use of Support Systems like Vocation (JOR 60)
943. Greater Effect in Decreasing Anxiety than Was Observed w/ Mindfulness Meditation [CR 417]
944. Exceptional in the Breadth and Depth of Beneficial Effects Associated w/ Anxiety Reduction [CR 417]
945. Increased Brain Integration [CR 417]
946. Markedly More Effective than other Techniques in Improving Psychological Variables [CR 02]
947. 48% Reduction in Clinically Significant Depression Symptoms [CR 242]
948. Improved Verbal-Analytical Tasking (Indicating Improved Functioning of both Left and Right Cerebral Hemispheres) [CR 101, 185, 266-268, 274-279, 283-284, 305, 397, 404]
949. Improved Visual-Spatial Tasking (Indicating Improved Functioning of both Left and Right Cerebral Hemispheres) [CR101, 185, 266-268, 274-279, 283-284, 305, 397, 404]
950. Reduced Blood Pressure In Pre-Hypertensive Adolescents [CR 22-25, 34]
951. Reduced Perceived Stress and Depression, and Burnout in Secondary Schoolteachers and Support Staff [CR 423]
952. Reduced Burnout in Secondary Schoolteachers and Support Staff [CR 423]
953. Produces Unexpected Improvements in Basic Cognitive Abilities that Do Not Usually Develop Beyond Early Adolescence [CR 266-267, 270, 275].
954. Increased Emotional Stability in Industrial Employees Compared to Controls [CR 61-62]
955. Reductions in Anxiety in Industrial Employees Compared to Controls [CR 61-62]
956. Reductions in Tendency to Neurosis in Industrial Employees Compared to Controls [CR 61-62]
957. Reductions in Impulsiveness in Industrial Employees Compared to Controls [CR 61-62]
958. Reductions in Physical Complaints in Industrial Employees Compared to Controls [CR 61-62]
959. Reductions in Insomnia in Industrial Employees Compared to Controls [CR 61-62]
960. Reductions in Smoking Compared to Controls in Industrial Employees Compared to Controls [CR 61-62]
961. Reductions in Depression in Industrial Employees Compared to Controls [CR 61-62]
962. Significantly Greater Improvement in General Health in Auto Workers Compared to Controls [CR 316]
963. Significantly Greater Reductions in Physiological Arousal in Auto Workers Compared to Controls [CR 316]
964. Significantly Greater Reductions in Anxiety in Auto Workers Compared to Controls [CR 316]
965. Significantly Greater Reductions in Job Tension in Auto Workers Compared to Controls [CR 316]
966. Significantly Greater Reductions in Insomnia in Auto Workers Compared to Controls [CR 316]
967. Significantly Greater Reductions in Fatigue in Auto Workers Compared to Controls [CR 316]
968. Significantly Greater Reductions in Consumption of Cigarettes in Auto Workers Compared to Controls [CR 316]
969. Significantly Greater Reductions in Hard Liquor Use in Auto Workers Compared to Controls [CR 316]
970. Significantly Greater Job Satisfaction Compared to Controls [CR 316-317]
971. Significantly Greater Employee Effectiveness Compared to Controls [CR 316-317]
972. Significantly Better Work Relationships Compared to Controls [CR 316-317]
973. Substantially Larger Improvements in Personal Relationships Compared to Controls [CR 316-317]
974. Substantially Larger Improvements in Occupational Coherence Compared to Other Forms of Meditation and Relaxation [316]
975. Substantially Larger Improvements in Physiological Settledness Compared to other Forms of Meditation and Relaxation [316]
976. Substantially Larger Improvements in Job Satisfaction Compared to Other Forms of Meditation and Relaxation [316]
977. Substantially Larger Improvements in Life Satisfaction Compared to Other Forms of Meditation and Relaxation [316]
978. Substantially Larger Improvements in Enhancing Personal Development Compared to Other Forms of Meditation and Relaxation [316]
979. Increased Organizational Contributions from Managers Compared to Controls [CR 318]
980. Increased Productivity in Managers [CR 318]
981. Increased Leadership Practices in Managers [CR 318]
982. Better Work Relationships in Managers [CR 318]
983. Increased Vitality in Managers [CR 318]
984. Increased Mental Health in Managers [CR 318]
985. Increased Job Satisfaction in Managers [CR 318]
986. Decreased Anger in Managers [CR 318]
987. Reduced Alcohol Consumption in Managers [CR 318]
988. Healthier Exercise Habits in Managers [CR 318]
989. Healthier Dietary Choices in Managers [CR 318]
990. Better Sleep in Managers [CR 318]
991. Decreased Serum Cholesterol in Managers [CR 318]
992. Increased Energy in Managers [CR 318]
993. Less Fatigue in Managers [CR 318]
994. Improved Mental Health in Managers [CR 318]
995. Reduced Stress-Related Physical Symptoms in Managers [CR 318]
996. Reduction in Perceived Stress in Overloaded Situations in Managers [CR 318]
997. Reduction in Perceived Stress in Uncontrollable Situations in Managers [CR 318]
998. Reduction in Perceived Stress in Unpredictable Situations in Managers [CR 318]
999. Reductions in Anxiety in High-Security Government Employees after 12 Weeks which was Sustained for 3 Years in Comparison to Controls who Participated in an Educational Corporate Stress-Management Program[CR 319]
1000. Reductions in Depression in High-Security Government Employees after 12 Weeks which was Sustained for 3 Years in Comparison to Controls who Participated in an Educational Corporate Stress-Management Program [CR 319]
1001. Sustained, 3 year Improvements in Self-Concept in High-Security Government Employees Compared to Controls who Participated in an Educational Corporate Stress-Management Program [CR 319]

– Hundreds of published benefits did not make this list because I stopped adding benefits when I got to 1001. Also, the most recent TM research (research after to 2009) is not included in this document. It will be included in the next edition of this list.

– References that begin with “CR” are from the Summary of Scientific Research on Transcendental Meditation. Dr Roger Chalmers, 16th April 2014 and can be found at <http://uk.tm.org/documents/12132/2642888/TM+Research+Summary+-Chalmers+16+April+2014.pdf/71a1af1c-9869-44a7-a1f0-b0a064b2fb9e>

– References that begin with “JOR” refer to: Pallone, Nathaniel, and Charles N. Alelxander, and Kenneth G. Walton, and David W. Orme-Johnson and Rachel S. Goodman, eds. Transcendental Meditation in Criminal Rehabilitation and Crime Prevention. Special issue of Journal of Offender Rehabilitation 36.1/2/3/4 (2003): 1-331.

– The 15 references that begin with “OR” refer to recent research conducted by the Oregon Department of Corrections and is yet unpublished

From 1001 Benefits of Transcending

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